Common Weed Identification

Weeds are the bane of every gardener, so we do our best to eradicate or “manage” them in The Spring Gardens.

Thanks to our Horticulture Committee and Jeff Janoski for preparing this during Summer 2010. Jeff passed away in 2011, and left a wonderful legacy of informed gardening and horticulture with The Spring Gardens. He is missed in our community of gardeners.

Weeds difficult to eradicate or Control:

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Morning Glory Distinguish the simple heart-shaped leaves of Morning Glory (left) from the compound three-parted leaves  typical of beans and peas (right)

 

Bind weed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common in Pathways:

Lamiums (Dead-nettle and Henbit, similar in appearance, flower -self-sow in the spring)

Yellow Field Cress (Right)  deeply-cut leaves are arranged in basal rosettes,  produces yellow flowers

Pigweed


 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Nutsedge – a weed – should not be confused with Liriope ( flat long leaf ornamental planted on garden perimeter as ground cover)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liriope (right)- Not a weed!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goutweed

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Poisonous Weeds

Pokeweed (Look for reddening stems and clusters of greenish-white flowers followed by dark purple berries.)   

 

Jimsonweed (produces trumpet-shaped flowers and spiny seed pods)  

 

 

Nightshade (flowers with yellow centers are followed by ruby-red fruit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weeds that look like they belong, but …

Mugwort (left)

Mallows (right) Some are large, some creepers.  All are “creeps” if they get out of control.

 

 

 

 

 

Plantain (left) Purselane (right)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lambsquarters (left)

Mint (below) (Control your plant!  Along with its cousins, Sage and Lamb’s Ears, Mint can self-sow and establish vigorous root systems!) Pick and use lots of mint if you have it in your plot – delicious mint ice tea, mint in spring rolls, mint juleps!

 

 

Thistles  

 

 

Tree of Heaven (stinky leaflets with notched bases. You’ll wish this tree had stayed in Brooklyn)

Golden Raintree (Note the compound leaves with toothed leaflets, and golden seeds) 

(Control your plant!Along with its cousins, Sage and Lamb’s Ears, Mint can self-sow and establish vigorous root systems!)